Tooth Loss- what are the unseen effects?

//Tooth Loss- what are the unseen effects?

Tooth Loss- what are the unseen effects?

So what exactly are the effects of tooth loss?

The most obvious effect of missing teeth is aesthetic. The way you look affects the way you feel, and the psychological and social consequences of tooth loss can also be profound.

However, it’s not just about unsightly gaps; there’s something less apparent going on in the area of a lost tooth that can affect function, health, facial aesthetics — just about everything.

tooth loss

Believe it or not, in the beginning and at the end — it’s not so much about teeth as it is about bone, which needs stimulation to maintain its form and density. In the case of alveolar (sac-like) bone which surrounds and supports teeth, the necessary stimulation comes from the teeth themselves. Teeth make hundreds of fleeting contacts with each other throughout the day. These small stresses are transmitted through the periodontal ligament (“peri” – around; “odont” – tooth) that suspends each tooth in its socket, prompting the bone to remodel and rebuild continually.

When a tooth is lost, the lack of stimulation causes loss of alveolar bone — its external width, then height, and ultimately bone volume. There is a 25% decrease in width of bone during the first year after tooth loss and an overall 4 millimeters decrease in height over the next few years.

As bone loses width, it loses height, then width and height again, and gum tissue also gradually decreases. Ability to chew and to speak can be impaired. The more teeth lost, the more function is lost. This leads to some particularly serious aesthetic and functional problems, particularly in completely edentulous (toothless) people.

Unfortunately,  it doesn’t stop there. After alveolar bone is lost, the bone beneath it, basal bone (the jawbone) proper — also begins to resorb (melt away). The distance from nose to chin decreases and with it, the lower third of the face partially collapses. The chin rotates forward and upward, and the cheeks, having lost tooth support, become hollow. Extreme loss of bone can also make an individual more prone to jaw fractures as its volume depletes more and more.

So-called bite collapse can occur when only some of the back teeth, which support the height (vertical dimension) of the face, are missing. This can cause the front teeth to be squashed or pushed forward. They were not designed to support facial height or to chew food — only to hold and incise or tear it. Toothless people appear unhappy when their mouths are at rest because their lips, too, have sagged; unsupported by teeth and gum tissues they just cave in. Without teeth present, the tongue spreads into the space and the face collapses. The same is true of self-confidence.

Do you avoid social occasions/smiling for photos/eating certain foods because of embarrassment associated with your missing tooth/teeth? If so, you might be a suitable candidate for dental implants.

At Dental House, our lead implantologist Dr Wilson Grigolli would be happy to help you to regain your confidence.  Having placed over 26,000 implants and training under Branemark the creator of the modern dental implant, Dr Grigolli has the expertise to transform your life.

To book a consultation with him:

Phone: 01-5378045

Lo-Call: 1890 22 33 44

Email: hello@dentalhouse.ie

Follow us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/dentalhousesmile

 

 

By | 2017-12-17T19:21:27+00:00 May 25th, 2017|Uncategorized|0 Comments

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